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Film of the day
Moretti's Comedies
Moretti's Comedies

Ecce bombo

Nanni Moretti Italy, 1978

We continue our excursion into the world of Nanni Moretti’s comedies with this early work which delicately unfurls the lives of its young characters—their anxieties, politics and romantic ambitions—with a graceful sense of humor distinct to the director. A slight yet key work in Moretti’s oeuvre.

I Am Self-Sufficient

Nanni Moretti Italy, 1976

29 days to watch
Moretti's Comedies

If you only know Palme d’Or winner The Son’s Room, our triple bill of Nanni Moretti’s early comedies will be a special treat. Shot on Super 8, this debut feature already boasts a perfect balance between autobiography, social commentary and satire, launching what would become the Moretti touch.

Le Moulin

Huang Ya-li Taiwan, 2015

Exclusive
28 days to watch

With remarkable variety of form and a graceful touch, this expansive yet tremendously sensitive debut by Huang Ya-li is an epic and detailed immersion into a remarkable group of writers in Taiwan. Spanning three decades of political turmoil and war, we movingly watch their struggle to create art.

Molly's Theory of Relativity

Jeff Lipsky United States, 2013

27 days to watch

Jeff Lipsky has quietly delivered a few of the strangest independents in recent years, and the beguiling and un-categorizable Molly’s Theory of Relativity is no exception. A portrait of a relationship? A family drama? A philosophical quandary? Or perhaps it’s just unsolvable–it is for you to decide.

Being 14

Hélène Zimmer France, 2015

26 days to watch

A quick-witted, and spirited youth movie from France, Hélène Zimmer’s film may not be anything new in terms of subject matter, but what it lacks in narrative invention it makes up for with an expressive sense of humor and an accuracy to the experience of young women. A unsung gem.

The Train to Moscow: A Journey to Utopia

Michele Manzolini, Federico Ferrone Italy, 2013

24 days to watch

The journey of a dream chased—and a dream awakened. A beautiful tale—and true story—spun from archival material telling of the infectious hopes and idealism of mid-century communism joyously loved and chased and then confronted with reality.

Le trou

Jacques Becker France, 1960

23 days to watch
Jacques Becker's
Companies

Our final group portrait by Becker is tragically his final film—dying after its completion at the age of 53—but also his best known and greatest. A singular prison escape film—based on a true story and made in collaboration with a participant—five inmates must stick together in order to break out.

Paris Frills

Jacques Becker France, 1945

22 days to watch
Jacques Becker's
Companies

Our next immersion into the vibrant group dynamics of French master orchestrator Jacques Becker turns from the crimes of Paris to high fashion. An energetic, remarkably realistic portrayal of the cultural scene in the 1940s, its legacy can be felt in everything from Funny Face to Saint Laurent.

Touchez pas au grisbi

Jacques Becker France, 1954

21 days to watch
Jacques Becker's
Companies

Jacques Becker, best known as an assistant to Jean Renoir, is in fact a consummate, under-known auteur particularly attuned to group dynamics, whether of lovers, artists or—as in this classic crime film—gangsters. Becker guides an unbeatable cast in this brilliant, world-weary genre masterpiece.

La ronde

Roger Vadim France, 1964

19 days to watch

Behold the distance between 1950, when Max Ophüls made his classic adaptation of Schnitzler’s play, and 1964, when Roger Vadim (……And God Created Woman), riding New Wave fervor, adapted the same! Ribald and brazen rather than elegant—and starring new generation icons Jane Fonda and Anna Karina.

The Boy from Geita

Vic Sarin Canada, 2014

18 days to watch

Persecution exists everywhere, but the cultural context can radically change its tenor, as it does in Tanzania with those who have albinism. This doc reveals the country’s superstitiously violent attitude, telling the powerful stories of two children, victims of under-acknowledged discrimination.

From What is Before

Lav Diaz Philippines, 2014

Exclusive
17 days to watch
It's About Time: The
Cinema of Lav Diaz

Lav’s Golden Leopard winner in Locarno is an epic remembrance of a period of transition that marked the traumatic time of dictator Ferdinand Marcos’ rule. The film’s structure unfurls with slow power, growing increasingly complex, political, and emotional over its five-and-a-half hour story.

Postcards from the Zoo

Edwin Indonesia, 2012

16 days to watch

Embrace your inner animal in this dreamily morphing Indonesian film that competed in the Berlinale. Using Jakarta’s zoo as a cinematic playground—akin to Jia Zhangke’s amusement park-centered The World—for animals, magic, and love, whimsical mythology turns to longing as a girl turns into an adult.

Paris

Cédric Klapisch France, 2008

15 days to watch

A quintessential import for all you Francophiles out there (we know who you are, and you are one of us!) coming from the director of L’auberge espagnole and Russian Dolls. This César-nominated drama stars that duo’s charming Romain Duris, alongside Juliette Binoche and Fabrice Luchini.

Oleg and the Rare Arts

Andrés Duque Spain, 2016

Exclusive
14 days to watch

The late piano genius Oleg Karavaichuk used to walk around the Hermitage like a ghost, a bit as if he owned the palace. In an attempt to portray his singular brilliance, Venezuela-born, Spain-based Duque has made a tender, otherworldly film about freedom, timelessness, and the fragility of beauty.

Air of Paris

Marcel Carné Italy, 1954

15 years and one world war later, Carné, Arletty and Gabin re-unite, and while the result isn’t the classic that is Le jour se lève, it is still an undeniable pleasure to see these two together again. Watching great actors age on-screen, chemistry intact, is one of the beguiling pleasures of cinema.

Le jour se lève

Marcel Carné France, 1939

In this week’s double feature we see a brilliant collaboration—between director Carné & icons Arletty and Jean Gabin—across the decades, beginning with this masterpiece of the 1930s. An obvious influence on film noir, Carné beautifully draws out the fatal romanticism embodied in his gorgeous stars.

Meet the Fokkens

Gabrielle Provaas, Rob Schröder Netherlands, 2011

11 days to watch

Okay, the title is a cheap attention-getter, but the subjects of this doc are certainly deserved of attention, a wouldn’t-believe-it-unless-you-see-it pair of Dutch sisters of the night. By turns raucous, tragic, charming and introspective, the film pays homage to a unique history of sex work.

Wild Innocence

Philippe Garrel France, 2001

Exclusive
10 days to watch
Philippe Garrel: Fight
for Eternity

The last film in our retrospective on Philippe Garrel (and the last ever shot by Raoul Coutard) sees this highly personal director—whose dramas flirt with autobiography, reveries and memories recast in celluloid—explore the emotional turmoil of a movie production whose story is undeniably personal.

The Retrieval

Chris Eska United States, 2013

9 days to watch

An eloquent dramatic inquiry into life during the Civil War and slavery, Chris Eska’s film is the independent alternative to Django Unchained (also from 2013) due to its complex consideration of the racial politics of the time. A difficult yet entirely necessary work of historical filmmaking.

Blind

Eskil Vogt Norway, 2014

8 days to watch

“A bubbling fountain of imagination and sorrow collected in a single person,” we wrote of the fascinating sightless heroine of Norwegian screenwriter Eskil Vogt’s feature debut. A sensitive, intriguing leap to the director’s chair by the screenwriter of Oslo, August 31st and Louder than Bombs

The Bridge

Eric Steel United Kingdom, 2006

7 days to watch

An icon of the American West and of the vibrant promise of the Bay Area, the Golden Gate bridge has its own infamous side as a magnet for suicide attempts. Eric Steel’s film is a powerful documentary of observation (and of some intervention) of man-made achievement and its unique locus desperation.

Weddings and Babies

Morris Engel United States, 1958

6 days to watch
The First Independent?

With Weddings and Babies, Morris Engel continued his investigation into the politics of relationships in addition to further developing the refreshing new aesthetics of his independent cinema. The result? A marvelous observational vision of romantic struggle, led by two unforgettable performances.

Lovers and Lollipops

Morris Engel, Ruth Orkin United States, 1956

5 days to watch
The First Independent?

Before Breathless or Shadows helped invent independent cinema, there was Morris Engel and Ruth Orkin. Together they pioneered the use of shooting on location, non-professional actors and handheld cinematography to weave intimate humanist portraits of working class life in New York City.

Papirosen

Gastón Solnicki Argentina, 2011

4 days to watch

An inquiry into the pervasive memory of World War II and its many effects on Jewish identity, Papirosen finds the uniquely talented Gastón Solnicki avoiding the usual faults of self-portraits. The result is a graceful consideration of post-war Jewish identity and the collective memory of a family.

The Wind of the Night

Philippe Garrel France, 1999

Exclusive
3 days to watch
Philippe Garrel: Fight
for Eternity

Garrel’s stark lyricism seems naturally suited to his trademark black and white—however, his work with color is equally poignant. The Wind of the Night is an unequivocally Garrelian look at the inescapable vulnerability of being human, showing us a side of Madame Deneuve we’re not used to seeing.

Under the Bombs

Philippe Aractingi Lebanon, 2007

2 days to watch

Under the Bombs ambitiously weaves documentary with staged drama in an expressive low-budget canvas. An act of cinematic reportage amidst the chaos and tragedy of the 2007 attacks on Lebanon, Philippe Aractingi’s film is also a brave act of defiance against the tragedy of war.

The Wicker Man

Robin Hardy United Kingdom, 1973

Expiring at midnight PDT

On iconic actor Christopher Lee’s birthday (he’d have been 95), we pay tribute with one of the best cult films of his overwhelmingly culty career. Despite being recently sullied by a Nicholas Cage remake, the oh-so-70s original still thrills with a palpable fear of rural communities and traditions.

Over the Years

Nikolaus Geyrhalter Austria, 2015

Taking the demise of a textile factory in Austria’s Waldviertel region as its starting point, with the antiquated manufacturing plant initially shown in full operation, this film poses the question of what work means for people’s self-image and character.

Over the Years just left...
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