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3.9
8,977 Ratings

Videodrome

Directed by David Cronenberg
Canada, 1983
Sci-Fi, Thriller

Synopsis

In a bid to boost ratings, a programmer for a trashy cable channel broadcasts a hyper-violent torture show called Videodrome. Whilst trying to uncover its origins, he goes on a hallucinatory journey into a shadow world of conspiracy, sadomasochism and bodily transformation.

Videodrome Directed by David Cronenberg
It’s interesting to see how this movie has been unpacked, from its initial release, to ten years ago, to five years ago – Cronenberg’s ideas discussed and theorized and mind fucking as the movie become closer and closer to the now. In five more years the movie may cease to be allegorical.
June 28, 2017
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Cronenberg’s sense of outrageous comedy sets up a brisk descent into madness and paranoia and sexual dysmorphia: a kinky-junkie bad trip. Harry traverses it with her seen-it-all veteran’s shrug, but she wouldn’t seem out of place in a pre-Code Hollywood oldie bantering with Jean Harlow or Joan Blondell either.
December 27, 2016
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Violent, erotic, and relentlessly weird—in other words, classic Cronenberg—Videodrome pits the CEO of a trash TV station (a superb James Woods) against a mysterious broadcast signal airing real violence and torture, content so visceral it thrusts its viewers into a fit of violent hallucinations.
October 29, 2015
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What are people saying?

  • FilmEdie's rating of the film Videodrome

    Cronenberg does McLuhan (and Baudrillard, and a little Foucault...). An orgiastic hour and a half of (literal! visceral!) immersion into media theory - media as extensions of the body; biopower; spectacular realities... Debbie Harry's lips... Beware the temptation to take this as any sort of straightforward moralizing; it's so much more delightful than that. Smart and hilarious. Long live the new flesh!

  • spAce_'s rating of the film Videodrome

    "The television screen is the retina of the mind's eye. Therefore, it is part of the physical structure of the brain. Therefore, whatever appears on the television screen emerges as raw experience for those who watch it. Therefore, television is reality, and reality is less than television."

  • Zachary George Najarian-Najafi's rating of the film Videodrome

    This movie should be required viewing in all high schools. It teaches the dangers of sex, violence, commercialism, hedonism, and over-reliance on technology. Cronenberg's sense of venereal horror is truly terrifying, and some of the scenes are downright disturbing. But his sense of the poetic is always welcome, and the moral that we are loosing our freedom and our flesh to technology is a timely and relevant warning.

  • mjgildea's rating of the film Videodrome

    Videodrome gets better every time I see it. Between the seediness Rick Baker's beautifully repellent and organically vile make-up designs and the mindfuck elements of the story (I never have any idea what's r e a l l y going on, even at the end) I'm absolutely in love with Videodrome. Its quickly becoming one of those rare movies I want to immediately watch again once its over.

  • Alonso Díaz de la Vega's rating of the film Videodrome

    A big joke on Marshall McLuhan's ideas, so if you don't really get what "the medium is the message" means, you might hav a hard time understanding this film, and might end up disregarding it as a surreal horror film, but this is actually science fiction satire/horror at its most intelligent and wonderfully executed -especially as far as special effects goes- way... Long live the new flesh.

  • Duncan Gray's rating of the film Videodrome

    Rarely has casting been so astute: a weaselly cocksure pro (James Woods) and an affectless, inaccessibly sexy non-actor (Debbie Harry) become automatons in a new world war fought via cathode rays. A little more warmth might have made the end sadder, but this captures Philip K. Dick's combination of parody and paranoia better than any actual PKD adaptation. Key warning: "It has a philosophy." Entertainment tends to.

  • Nicholas Gregory's rating of the film Videodrome

    As a statement, it may be the most prescient social-political commentary in a film of all time. Part-observational, part-crystal gazer foreshadowing of media's smokescreen of manipulation and over-stimulation. It also has never been stronger as now in this computer age. As a film, it's less character driven, thus not pulling you into its mindfuck-surrealism, and making its creativity incredibly sterile in emotion.

  • Stefan Drees's rating of the film Videodrome

    One of Cronenberg's most visionary and disturbing films, anticipating some of the ideas from "eXistenZ". Although "Videodrome" is 35 years old its discourse about immersion into media and amalgamation of body and technology is still up-to-date.

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