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7.3
/10
1,022 Ratings

The Addiction

Directed by Abel Ferrara
United States, 1995
Horror, Drama, Avant-Garde

Synopsis

Kathleen Conklin, a doctoral student in philosophy, finds herself with a new perspective on the nature of evil and humanity after being bitten by a vampire in New York City….

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The Addiction Directed by Abel Ferrara

Critics reviews

Like Abel Ferrara’s other collaborations with screenwriter Nicholas St. John, The Addiction is rife with intense and undigested contradictions. The film loosely mixes addiction and assault metaphors, capturing the self-loathing of addicts while almost inadvertently suggesting that victims of sexual abuse have it coming.
June 26, 2018
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The film invents a critical circulation of images—tearing those images away from the univocality of memory in an attempt to radically manifest their current, active nature (dramatized in terms of their harmfulness). In this economy the image no longer represents a prop but an agent, no longer a reflection but a cause—and it is impossible to be cured of it.
December 20, 2006

What are people saying?

  • tidal waif's rating of the film The Addiction

    For the record: tempestuous name-dropping doesn't amount to philosophy just as casual bomb dropping challenged here won't add up to strategy. Wish Ferrara did what Kafka had attempted in Metamorphosis and Painlevé in underwater docs: recreate another species' Umwelt not through the lens of human Umgebung, our so-called objective space we impose scruplelessly upon all the rest, but from the changing alter-human angle.

  • El Biffo's rating of the film The Addiction

    Great vampire film in Black & White with Lili Taylor, Annabella Sciorra and Christopher Walken, who is oh-so perfect as a seasoned, jaded vampire.

  • HKFanatic's rating of the film The Addiction

    "Bad Lieutenant" is perhaps the defining film of Abel Ferrara's career—even though the picture wasn't a financial success, the controversy it generated seemed to spur on Ferrara as a provocateur. That's the only reason I can explain why his '95 effort "The Addiction" forces the viewer to confront graphic imagery of the Holocaust in the midst of a 'vampires as junkies' story. But the b&w aesthetic is beyond gorgeous.

  • VincentVendetta's rating of the film The Addiction

    The Addiction fits very neatly into Ferrara's filmography, and as a mood piece, the first fifteen minutes are absolutely masterful. But when Lili Taylor becomes the university student with a detached, too-kool-for-skool attitude spewing hard truths (Hello 90's cinema! Hello Jarmusch!), it loses a lot of mystery and vulnerability. For me, King of New York will always be Ferrara's greatest vampire movie.

  • Ethan's rating of the film The Addiction

    Lili Taylor gives an explosive performance in this brilliant, nightmarish horror film from the incredible Abel Ferrara. The black and white cinematography adds a certain eeriness that makes this film a haunting urban nightmare that has a lot to say about society while still maintaining its status as a horror film. A true gem.

  • Jason's rating of the film The Addiction

    THE ADDICTION came out when I was in high school. Spoke to me. Naturally, by grad school I had me a bit of an intravenous opiate habit. Movie checked out. Yo, I ran w/ these vampires. THE ADDICTION demonstrates that solid thought-through conceptual architecture can become armor for bad bad badness (Heidegger, Nietzsche). Ideally you turn your will and your life over to God as you understand him. That too checks out.

  • Nicholas Gregory's rating of the film The Addiction

    At face-value, the turning-vampire being a philosophy student is as obtuse and pseudo-intellectual as its quote-unquote witty idea. The digressions are forced into themes as much as its didacticism is freshman-year in its discourse. It wasn't until I realized that it's actually vamping on the sad presumption that higher academia alone means surefire success and greater understanding, that I loved it as a work of art.

  • Gia de Almeida's rating of the film The Addiction

    We get it, vampirism as a metaphor for addiction, nice. Ferrara establishes the metaphor and has no clue of where to go from there so, after that it's a rather dull, repetitive affair. If this was all he had he should have gone for a short, this would have been brilliant as a short.

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