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Critics reviews
Starman
John Carpenter United States, 1984
As odd as it may sound, the use of pre-Beatles pop music forms the clearest bridge between Christine and the film that followed it: 1984’s Starman, an extraterrestrial romance and one of Carpenter’s best films.
May 04, 2017
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Carpenter leans back a bit with the ticking-clock structure, and in its best moments, STARMAN uses its hokey, new-agey story to gaze out upon and muse on the American countryside. So the film’s portrait of the American mid and south-west in the 80’s takes on a documentary quality, similar to TWO-LANE BLACKTOP in the early 70’s.
March 04, 2016
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Carpenter’s camera maintains utter fidelity to [Karen Allen’s] emotions, whether heartbreakingly rendering her loneliness and loss at the film’s outset, or chronicling her journey with Bridges’ mysterious, benevolent being. The effect is beautiful and totally reliant on Allen’s performance, surely among the strongest in the director’s filmography, as she conveys pain, depression, love, and, most movingly, healing.
February 06, 2015
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Jeff Bridges, who was nominated for a Best Actor Oscar, is entrancing. He’s an actor that allows you to see him think – which is essential for the part of a quickly adaptive alien being. He’s constantly computing, weighing and evaluating, conveyed in his bird-like head bobs and the gentle querying in his gaze. Karen Allen is quite moving as his straight woman, her arc from exasperation to indulgence to affection demonstrated in her wide-set searching eyes.
December 09, 2014
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Perhaps trying to change his horror-purveying image, [Carpenter has] here succumbed to slavish Spielbergism, from the film’s opening crypto Kodak ad through the reverent little theme that underlines all the action to the White Christmas glow of its heartclutching closer.
December 25, 1984
[This] tale of an extraterrestrial being who takes on the form of a young man killed in a sudden accident and then strikes up a relationship with his widow represents a surprisingly moving response to the problem of death in a postreligious age. The resurrected husband is allowed to finish his business on earth (declaring his love and fathering a child), and keeps his rendezvous at the appointed hour, ascending as spectacularly as you-know-who.
December 25, 1984
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